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Animal Models
Animal Model Summary Overview
The animal model summaries and descriptions have been curated by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines (ACTIV) Preclinical Working Group with support from the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH). New and updated information, including detailed individual animal model pages, will be provided as more scientific studies are shared. Please continue to check back for more information.
Feedback, comments, and questions are highly encouraged to further develop these pages. Please contact ACTIVpreclinical@fnih.org.

Small Animals

Species Modification Model Name/Nomenclature
Vaccines
Antivirals
Neutralizing Antibodies
Other Therapies
Infectivity
Transmission
Disease Enhancement
Disease Manifestation & Pathology Extent of disease
Updated:

Non-Human Primates

Species Geographic Origin Route of Exposure
Vaccines
Antivirals
Neutralizing Antibodies
Other Therapies
Infectivity
Transmission
Disease Enhancement
Disease Manifestation & Pathology Extent of disease
Updated:


= The model can be used to evaluate the noted agent type.
Y = Yes
N = No
TBD = *To be determined (TBD) entries indicate those for which there is either in progress relevant research studies or an absence of data in the current literature.
Other Therapies = Includes immunomodulators.
Field Guide: Best Practices for COVID-19 Research in Small Animal Models
The small animal model videos are a compendium of world expert guidance on best practices for the use of small animal models for COVID 19 research. The videos were developed in an effort to support harmonization of best practices for the use of small animal models.
Since SARS-COV-2 was first reported in late 2019, researchers around the world shifted gears to conduct COVID-19 studies. However, limited resources, including BSL 3 /4 facilities and COVID-19 animal models, have prompted an effort to harmonize and streamline guidance to make the best use of available biomedical research resources and facilitate interpretation and comparison of the results across studies. Using the Small Animal Model Field Guide and these videos as a guide, researchers will be able to improve harmonization and make the best use of available biomedical research resources.
Additional ACTIV Preclinical Resources
The ACTIV Preclinical Working Group has also produced the following sources to help researchers develop their COVID-19 projects:
1. Accelerated Preclinical Paths to Support Rapid Development of COVID-19 Therapeutics
Grobler, JA, et al. Cell Host & Microbe (2020), doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chom.2020.09.017
Abstract
When SARS-CoV-2 emerged at the end of 2019, no approved therapeutics or vaccines were available. An urgent need for countermeasures during this crisis challenges the current paradigm of traditional drug discovery and development, which usually takes years from start to finish. Approaches that accelerate this process need to be considered. Here we propose the minimum data package required to move a compound into clinical development safely. We further define the additional data that should be collected in parallel without impacting the rapid path to clinical development. Accelerated paths for antivirals, immunomodulators, anticoagulants and other agents have been developed and can serve as "roadmaps" to support prioritization of compounds for clinical testing. These accelerated paths are fueled by a skewed risk-benefit ratio and are necessary to advance therapeutic agents into human trials rapidly and safely for COVID-19. Such paths are adaptable to other potential future pandemics.
2. ACTIVating Resources for the COVID-19 Pandemic: In vivo Models for Vaccines and Therapeutics
Hewitt, JA., et al. Cell Host & Microbe (2020), doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chom.2020.09.016
Abstract
The Preclinical Working Group of Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines (ACTIV), a public-private partnership spearheaded by the National Institutes of Health, was charged with identifying, prioritizing, and communicating SARS-CoV-2 preclinical resources. Reviewing SARS-CoV-2 animal model data facilitates standardization and harmonization and informs knowledge gaps and prioritization of limited resources. To date, mouse, hamster, ferret, guinea pig, and non-human primates have been investigated. Several species are permissive for SARS-CoV-2 replication, often exhibiting mild disease with resolution, reflecting most human COVID-19 cases. More severe disease develops in a few models, some associated with advanced age, a risk factor for human disease. This review provides a snapshot that recommends the suitability of models for testing vaccines and therapeutics, which may evolve as our understanding of COVID-19 disease biology improves. COVID-19 is a complex disease and individual models recapitulate certain aspects of disease; therefore, the coordination and assessment of animal models is imperative.
3. Field Guide: Best Practices for COVID-19 Research in Small Animal Models
Please visit: https://fnih.org/content/activ-preclinical-working-group-small-animal-model-field-guide-and-video-sessions for the PDF field guide and videos.
The small animal model videos are a compendium of world expert guidance on best practices for the use of small animal models for COVID 19 research. The videos were developed in an effort to support harmonization of best practices for the use of small animal models.
Since SARS-COV-2 was first reported in late 2019, researchers around the world shifted gears to conduct COVID-19 studies. However, limited resources, including BSL 3 /4 facilities and COVID-19 animal models, have prompted an effort to harmonize and streamline guidance to make the best use of available biomedical research resources and facilitate interpretation and comparison of the results across studies. Using the Small Animal Model Field Guide and these videos as a guide, researchers will be able to improve harmonization and make the best use of available biomedical research resources.



NCATS OpenData is licensed under a CC BY 4.0 license | 2020